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Here’s some good news on a win/win/win scenario for businesses (big and small), young work-seekers, and South Africa generally.

Everyone will be happy to learn that government’s initiative to encourage increased youth employment, the Employment Tax Incentive or ETI (commonly also referred to as the “Youth Employment Tax Incentive”), has now been extended for ten years.

So let’s recap what the ETI is, how it works, what conditions apply, and how it benefits you as an employer on the tax front, as summarised in a convenient ETI Calculation Table from SARS.

There is chronic unemployment in the country and it is especially felt by the youth where up to 50% cannot find a job. The Employment Tax Incentive (ETI) is designed to encourage companies to employ “youths” (between the ages of 18 to 29) for 1 to 2 years.

Incentives for employers to make use of the ETI are attractive. You can deduct from your monthly PAYE owing the amounts shown below in the third column. In addition, these deductible amounts are exempt from Income Tax i.e. you get a double benefit.

The monthly calculated ETI amount per qualifying employee is determined as follows:

Youth Employment Tax Incentive Tables 2019

Source: SARS

There are conditions – the employer must be in good standing with SARS and employees (apart from being aged 18 to 29) must have valid ID documents (or be a legal refugee).

This is a good incentive and it helps to address one of South Africa’s intractable problems. Another advantage is you can over the two year period identify employees with potential who will fit into your business.

Speak to us to ensure you claim this incentive correctly.